About Best Management Practices (BMP) for Waste Water Control. 2008, Still Applicable

 

 

Preventing Stormwater Pollution:

Your Guide To
BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (BMPs)
For Pressure Washing
And
Surface Cleaning

In The Greater Sacramento Area

Guidance on Practical Methods Used To Protect the Environment & Comply With Regulatory Requirements

 

December 2008

 

Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

This publication was prepared through a local collaboration of:

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i

County of Sacramento

DEPARTMENT OF
WATER RESOURCES Stormwater Quality Program

County of Sacramento

Local stormwater agency for the unincorporated area of Sacramento County

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
DEPARTMENT
Environmental Compliance Division

Performs stormwater compliance inspections for targeted industrial activities on behalf of the Sacramento Stormwater Quality Partnership

Sacramento Stormwater Quality Partnership

Partnership of local stormwater agencies for the unincorporated area of Sacramento County and the cities of Citrus Heights, Elk Grove, Folsom, Galt, Rancho Cordova, and Sacramento

Business Environmental Resource Center

Providing free and confidential permitting and compliance assistance to businesses in the greater Sacramento area on behalf of local government

Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District

Wastewater Source Control Section

Sewer agency for most of the greater Sacramento area

Disclaimer

Please note that the information presented in this document is intended for guidance purposes only and is not all-inclusive. This information may be of value as an education or reference tool, but no endorsement of product or content is intended. Please note that laws and regulations are subject to change. It is recommended that the applicable codes and statutes be reviewed to verify those pertinent to your activities. The content of this booklet may not reflect recent changes in applicable laws and regulations.

Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Table Of Contents

Resources & Key Regulatory Agency Contacts .......................................................................................................... 1

h Non-Regulatory Resources for Getting Help h Educational Resources
h Regulatory Agency Contacts

Booklet Purpose & Regulatory Overview.....................................................................................................................2

h Booklet Purpose
h Applicability
h Wastewater Discharges Violate Storm Water Ordinances h Possible Fines & Penalties
h Photos Of Storm Water Violations

Stormwater Regulations ................................................................................................................................................ 3

h Federal, State & Local Regulations h Wastewater Discharges Prohibited h Local Stormwater Agencies

Identifying The Storm Drain System..........................................................................................................................4-5

h Storm Drains Flow To Our Creeks & Rivers
h Storm Drains & Sanitary Sewer Drains Are Not The Same h Photos Of Storm Drain Inlets
h Photos Of Sanitary Sewer Maintenance Access Points

Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning: A Problem & A Solution.............................................................................6

h Pressure Washing Basics
h Surface Cleaning Applications
h Pressure Washing Wastewater Can Pose A Stormwater Problem h Proper Wastewater Management Is The Solution

ThingsToKnowUpfront: Requirements&Prohibitions...........................................................................................7

h Compliant Wastewater Management & Disposal Is Required

h Specific Prohibitions
Introduction To Best Management Practices (BMPs) For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning.........................8

h Best Management Practices Overview
h Types Of BMPs
h BMP Basics For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning Activities

Best Management Practices (BMPs) In Detail For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning.....................................9

h Detailed BMP Guidance
Proper Containment & Collection Of Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning Wastewater ..............................10-11

h Basic Information On Containment & Collection
h Examples & Descriptions Of Containment Systems
h Examples & Descriptions Of Collection Systems
h Know This Before You Build A Structure Or Buy A Wastewater Treatment Unit

Proper Disposal Of Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning Wastewater ...........................................................12-13

h An Overview Of Proper Disposal Of Pressure Washing Wastewater h Sanitary Sewer Disposal Outside The SRCSD Service Area
h How To Access The Sanitary Sewer For Wastewater Disposal

Some Facts About Stormwater Pollution & Water Quality .......................................................................................14

 

h h

Did You Know That?
Our Water Quality Depends On It

 

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Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Resources & Key Regulatory Agency Contacts

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Non-Regulatory Resources For Getting Help Business Environmental Resource Center (BERC)

Provides free & confidential permit and compliance assistance in the greater Sacramento area

Cleaning Equipment Trade Association (CETA) Professional trade association

Power Washers of North America (PWNA) Professional trade association

Educational Resources

(916) 874-2100

http://www.sacberc.org/

(800) 441-0111

http://www.ceta.org/index.html

(800) 393-7962

http://www.pwna.org/

Local Stormwater Agency Compliance Assistance Brochures & Bulletins http://www.sacramentostormwater.org/SSQP/documents.asp http://www.emd.saccounty.net/WP/EMDstormwater.htm#Informational_materials

Best Management Practices Guidance or Resources http://www.cabmphandbooks.com/BGSList.asp http://www.cabmphandbooks.com/Industrial.asp http://sacberc.org/Web/pdfs/Stormwater/OCT2007_SW_BMP_resources.pdf

BERC Listing of Stormwater Compliant Pressure Washers

http://sacberc.org/Web/pdfs/Courtesy_List/AUG2008_StormwaterCompliantPressureWasherListing.pdf

Application for business listing can be found at:

http://sacberc.org/Web/pdfs/Courtesy_List/OCT2007_RequestforStormwaterCompliantPressureWasherLising.pdf

Regulatory Agency Contacts Sacramento Stormwater Quality Partnership

Regulatory agency partnership for stormwater programs of the cities of Citrus Heights, Elk Grove, Folsom, Galt, Rancho Cordova & Sacramento and Sacramento County’s unincorporated area

City of Galt Department of Public Works (Sanitary Sewer) City of Isleton
City of Isleton Waste Water Treatment Operator
City of West Sacramento Stormwater Program
Sacramento County Environmental Management Department

Hazardous Materials Division (HMD) Water Protection Division (WPD)

Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District (SRCSD) Wastewater Source Control Section (WSCS)

Yolo County Hazardous Waste Generators Program

(916) 808-4H2O (4426)

http://www.sacramentostormwater.org

(209) 366-7260
(916) 777-7770
(209) 530-9910
(916) 617-4864 http://www.emd.saccounty.net/ (916) 875-8550

(916) 875-8400 (916) 875-6470

http://www.srcsd.com/wscs.php

(530) 666-8646

 

Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Stormwater Regulations

Federal, State & Local Regulations

Federal and State regulations prohibit pollutant discharges to water bodies and require that local governments implement stormwater compliance programs that protect water quality.

The State of California oversees the local stormwater regulatory programs by issuing Municipal Stormwater Permits (MS4 Permits) to local agencies which require that municipalities:

  • reduce pollutants in stormwater runoff (runoff directly caused by rainfall) to the maximum extent practicable,

  • effectively prevent non-stormwater discharges, and

  • adopt local stormwater ordinances.

    Wastewater Discharges Prohibited

    As required by Federal and State regulations, all local stormwater ordinances prohibit the discharge of wastewater from pressure washing/surface cleaning to the storm drain system (including storm drains, roadside ditches, gutters, streets, sidewalks, drainage channels, swales, creeks and streams), or any natural or surface waters.

    Discharges to the storm drain system are only allowable when approved in writing by the local stormwater jurisdiction and the State of California’s Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board.

    Local Stormwater Agencies

    In the Sacramento area, the local agencies responsible for stormwater regulation in the unincorporated area of Sacramento County and the cities of Citrus Heights, Elk Grove, Folsom, Galt, Rancho Cordova & Sacramento have formed a partnership called the Sacramento Stormwater Quality Partnership. This Partnership works together to achieve the objective of protecting the storm drain system, local water quality and local waterways by eliminating harmful pollutant discharges to the storm drain system.

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Here is a listing of all local stormwater regulatory contacts:

h h h h h h h h h h h

City of Citrus Heights Stormwater Management Program
City of Elk Grove Stormwater Management Program
City of Folsom Stormwater Management Program
City of Galt Department of Public Works Stormwater Management Program City of Isleton

City of Rancho Cordova Stormwater Management Program City of Sacramento Stormwater Management Program
City of West Sacramento Stormwater Management Program Sacramento Stormwater Quality Partnership

Sacramento County, Department of Water Resources, Stormwater Quality Program

Sacramento County, Environmental Management Department, Water Protection Division (WPD)

(916) (916) (916) (209) (916) (916) (916) (916) (916) (916)

(916)

874-6851 478-2263 351-3545 366-7260 777-7770 874-6851 808-4H2O (4426) 617-4864 808-4H2O (4426) 874-6851

875-8400

 

Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Booklet Purpose & Regulatory Overview

Booklet Purpose

This publication provides information on practical methods, known as Best Management Practices (BMPs), to be used for the disposal of waste and wastewater from pressure washing and surface cleaning activities conducted within Sacramento County, including the incorporated cities in the Sacramento area. It is also applicable to activities conducted within West Sacramento.

As used in this booklet, the term “pressure washing” encompasses pressure washing and other forms of surface cleaning.

Applicability

The information in this booklet applies to:

  • mobile contractors providing pressure washing/surface cleaning services to others,

  • businesses using pressure washing/surface cleaning equipment in their operations or maintenance (such as cleaning heavy equipment, patios, walkways, parking lots, etc),

  • anyone (businesses and/or individuals) hiring pressure washing/surface cleaning contractors, and

  • homeowners.

    Wastewater Discharges Violate Storm Water Ordinances

    Sacramento County and all incorporated cities within the county have local stormwater ordinances in place to prevent pollution of local waterways. The storm drain system flows directly to local creeks and rivers. Chemicals, dirt, detergents, oil/grease, and heavy metals are common pollutants in wastewater that can harm aquatic life, contaminate our drinking water sources and impair our enjoyment of our recreational waterways.

    It is a violation of local stormwater ordinances to:

    • discharge wastewater of any kind into the storm drain system, or

    • manage wastewater discharge in a way that results in the potential for pollutant discharges to the storm drain system. This includes potential future pollutant discharges that may occur when it rains or when pollutants come into contact with irrigation run-off. For example, wastewater that dries on pavement doesn’t create an immediate discharge, but will likely result in residual pollutants being washed into the storm drain system by a future rain event.

      Possible Fines & Penalties

      Violations of local stormwater ordinances can result fines of up to $5,000 per day!

      It is also important to understand that businesses that don’t perform their own pressure washing/surface cleaning, but hire contractors for these services, may be subject to enforcement if contractors illegally dispose of wastewater to the storm drain system on their property.

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Photos Of Storm Water Violations

Violation Example 1: discharge of waste flowing directly into storm drain...

Violation Example 2: wash water discharge from cleaning flows to storm drain system...

 

Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Identifying The Storm Drain System

Storm Drains Flow To Our Creeks & Rivers

The storm drain system:

h is the outdoor network of drains, pipes, swales, ditches, channels, creeks and streams that carries stormwater from urban areas directly to local creeks and rivers,

h includes paved surfaces such as streets, sidewalks, and gutters, h is NOT treated in any way to remove any pollutants.

Pollutants discharged into the storm drain system, or picked up by flowing stormwater, are taken directly to our creeks and rivers!

Ultimately, these pollutants can make their way to our drinking water supply and/or the ocean, as is depicted in the graphic to the right.

Storm Drains & Sanitary Sewer Drains Are Not The Same

The storm drain system should not be confused with the sanitary sewer system.

The sanitary sewer system conveys wastewater from indoor facilities and operations, like sinks, toilets, washing machines, and carwash facilities, to a sewage treatment plant where the wastewater is disinfected to ensure public safety before being released to the environment.

The storm drain system conveys excess stormwater and irrigation water from neighborhoods and streets to nearby creeks, rivers and other drainage areas to prevent flooding. As a result, it is important to keep pollutants, including all types of wastewater, from discharging into the storm drain system and from accumulating on surfaces that are exposed to rainfall.

Virtually all outdoor drains in streets, parking lots, and elsewhere are storm drains which may not be used for wastewater disposal!

Summary of Differences Between Storm Drain & Sanitary Sewer Systems

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Storm drain system

Sanitary sewer system

• Is meant to remove excess rainwater or other outdoor water from streets & neighborhoods

• Entry points are always outdoor drains
• Receives no treatment whatsoever for harmful pollutants or chemicals before

entering environment
• Drains directly to neighborhood creeks & rivers
• Feeds our community’s recreational and drinking water supply

• Is meant to remove wastewater from specific human activities

• Entry points are indoor drains or specific access points like clean-outs

• Receives disinfection treatment before treated water is discharged to the environment

Refer to the next page for photos that may help you identify the storm drain and sanitary sewer systems in our community.

Continued on next page

 

Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Identifying The Storm Drain System, continued Photos Of Storm Drain Inlets

As shown here, storm drains are located outdoors, often in parking lots and street gutters.

Storm drains like these carry untreated water to our creeks & rivers.

Photos Of Sanitary Sewer Maintenance Access Points

Sanitary sewer drains are found indoors. However, you will see maintenance access points to the sanitary sewer system like these, commonly known as manhole covers, located outdoors and along streets. They are usually labeled as “Sewer,” “Sanitary Sewer,” or simply with “S.”

Sanitary sewer covers like these provide maintenance access points to the sanitary sewer pipes that transport wastewater to a treatment plant.

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Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning: A Problem & A Solution

Pressure Washing Basics

Pressure washing uses mechanical equipment to create a high pressure water stream that is:

  • typically sprayed from a hand-held wand or nozzle,

  • used for cleaning a wide variety of surfaces and objects, and

  • conducted with or without heated water or added cleaners.

    Surface Cleaning Applications

    Pressure washing and other methods are used to clean many surfaces including:

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• Parking lots
• Automobile & truck fleets
• Building exteriors
• Graffiti
• Restaurant equipment & hood filters

• Drive-thrus
• Heavy equipment • Sidewalks •Roofs

Pressure washing/surface cleaning techniques may also be used for stripping paint, surface preparation and other means.

Pressure Washing Wastewater Can Pose A Stormwater Problem

Pressure washing wastewater that isn’t properly managed creates a stormwater pollution problem because:

  • most pressure washing activities are conducted outside,

  • pressure washing wastewater contains pollutants, such as heavy metals, chemicals, or oil and grease, associated with cleaning compounds and/or the objects or surfaces being cleaned,

  • pressure washing wastewater discharged to the storm drain system enters storm drains and flows, without removal of pollutants, directly into lakes, rivers, and streams,

  • pollutants discharged to the storm drain system harm wildlife, fish, and aquatic organisms, contaminate drinking water supplies, and make it unsafe to swim in, or eat fish from, our waterways, and

  • it is illegal to discharge wastewater to the storm drain system.

    To prevent stormwater pollution and potentially costly stormwater violations, steps must be taken to collect and dispose of pressure washing wastewater legally. Remember: Nearly all outdoor drains are storm drains!

    Proper Wastewater Management Is The Solution

    Pressure washing activities done properly can help improve the quality of our waters and have a positive impact on the environment because when pollutants are removed from pressure washed surfaces, there is less chance for those pollutants to end up in our waterways!

    When Best Management Practices (BMPs) are followed—and wastewater and captured pollutants from pressure washed surfaces are properly contained, collected and disposed of, rather than improperly discharged to the storm drain system—pressure washing can actually be beneficial to the environment.

 

Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Things To Know Upfront: Requirements & Prohibitions

Compliant Wastewater Management & Disposal Is Required

Many types of regulations may apply to the disposal of wastewater, depending on the characteristics of the wastewater and the types of pollutants it contains. The wastewater characteristics may trigger regulations and/or permit requirements related to sanitary sewer disposal, hazardous waste management or disposal, land disposal—or many others.

It is the responsibility of the generator to determine the proper management, collection and disposal requirements for wastewater created by pressure washing. To avoid unanticipated costs, delays, and violations, this determination should always be made prior to starting any job.

Specific Prohibitions

These activities are prohibited by Federal, State, and/or local authorities under any circumstances:

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Prohibition Relates to...

Storm drain system

Evaporation

Land disposal

It is illegal to...

• Discharge pressure washing wastewater into any natural body of water or the storm drain system, which includes storm drains, roadside ditches, gutters, streets, sidewalks, swales, drainage channels, creeks and streams.

• Allow the evaporation of wastewater on paved surfaces. This is because the residue will eventually be discharged to the storm drain system when it rains or through contact with non-stormwater discharges such as irrigation run-off.

Sanitary sewer disposal

Septic systems

Hazardous waste

• •

• •

• •

Discharge onto land any wastewater containing garbage, food wastes, trash or hazardous substances.

Create nuisance conditions through disposal of wastewater to land such as dead vegetation, fly or insect breeding/attraction, odors, mud puddles, mud track-out to streets and parking lots, etc.

Allow wastewater overflow from land disposal onto paved surfaces or into the storm drain system. Dispose of wastewater to land without the property owner’s permission.

Dispose of pressure washing wastewater to the sanitary sewer system within the Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District (SRCSD) without getting approval and/or discharge permits as required. The SRCSD service area includes the unincorporated area of Sacramento County; the cities of Sacramento, Citrus Heights, Rancho Cordova, Folsom, Elk Grove and West Sacramento; and the towns of Walnut Grove, Courtland and Locke.

Important Notes:

  1. Residential SRCSD customers conducting pressure washing activities at their homes do not need a permit. Stationary business pressure washing their own equipment may be required to obtain a discharge permit. However, all users are encouraged to comply with the SRCSD Consolidated Ordinance discharge requirements. Using the BMPs described in this document can help all users to comply with SRCSD requirements.

  2. Discharges to the sanitary sewer within the Isleton or Galt must comply with the requirements of those sewer districts. Call the City of Galt (209) 366-7260 or the City of Isleton (916) 777-7770.

Dispose of wastewater to the sanitary sewer system within the Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District (SRCSD) without complying with the SRCSD Combined Ordinance and/or Surface Cleaning Wastewater Policy. Call (916) 875-6470 for more information.

Discharge pressure washing wastewater into a private sanitary sewer inlet/clean-out without the property owner’s (customer’s) permission.

Discharge into a public manhole or public sanitary sewer clean-out without specific prior authorization.

Discharge pressure washing wastewater to a septic system anywhere without prior approval. In Sacramento County, call the County Water Protection Division (916-875-8400). In West Sacramento, call Yolo County Environmental Health (530-666-8646). Discharges that contain hazardous waste, may potentially harm septic systems, or are likely to contaminate groundwater, will not be approved.

Improperly discharge or dispose of pressure washing wastewater that contains hazardous substances or hazardous wastes. The cleaning of surfaces with strong acids or caustics (like hydrofluoric acid and/or muriatic acid) or cleaning surfaces containing lead-based paint or accumulations of antifreeze, oil & grease, or solvents may result in generating wastewater that may be classified as a hazardous waste (which then must be managed/disposed of in accordance with hazardous waste regulations). Generating hazardous waste can prove costly and can limit your disposal options. For more information, in Sacramento County, call the Hazardous Materials Division at (916) 875-8550. In West Sacramento, call Yolo County Hazardous Waste at (530) 666-8646. Or, call BERC at (916) 874-2100.

 

Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Introduction To Best Management Practices (BMPs) For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning

Best Management Practices Overview

Best Management Practices (BMPs) are practices that eliminate, reduce, or treat pollutant discharges or potential exposures that would otherwise adversely impact stormwater quality.

Types Of BMPs

BMPs for pressure washing/surface cleaning may be categorized as shown here:

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BMP Type

Administrative

Source Control

Description

Administrative actions or policies that reduce or eliminate potential exposures or discharges to stormwater

Physical features and actions that control and prevent storm water pollution

Examples

Employee training
Pre-planning
Pre-cleaning policies

Collection berms Proper disposal

BMP Basics For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning Activities

There are some basic BMP measures that should be implemented for pressure washing and surface cleaning activities to avoid adverse environmental impacts and/or possible violations of State, Federal and local laws, regulations and/or ordinances. The basic BMPs are:

  • Pre-plan .......................................................................

  • Pre-clean (dry methods) ............................................

Think ahead about the job and how to complete it properly

Minimize the pollutants that will be captured with your water-borne cleaning activities

Perform cleaning in a way that prevents or minimizes potential discharges

Contain & collect wastewater for proper disposal

Utilize a disposal option that is appropriate for the type of wastewater/wastes generated

Use sound techniques...............................................

Collect wastewater.....................................................

Properly dispose of wastewater/wastes ..................

Each of these BMPs and related specific actions and guidance is discussed in detail in the next section of this booklet.

 

Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Best Management Practices (BMPs) In Detail For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning

Detailed BMP Guidance

Here is a more detailed summary of BMP guidance for pressure washing or surface cleaning.

Pre-plan .........................................................................................................................................................................

Obtain any necessary permits & authorizations for wastewater disposal (such as mobile pressure washer/surface cleaner permit, permit for septage dump station disposal).

  •  Identify locations of all storm drains and points where wastewater from your activities could enter the storm drain system.

  •  Specifically determine how to contain & collect wastewater from each different cleaning activity or work area.

  •  Identify proper disposal options for the types of wastewater & waste.

  •  Get property owner’s permission to access viable on-site disposal points.

    Pre-clean (dry methods) ..............................................................................................................................................

  •  Pre-sweep and use dry spot cleaning methods to pre-clean whenever possible (for example, pre-clean oily deposits with absorbent); don’t allow any pre-cleaning debris/material to enter the storm drain system—remove it before wet-washing.

  •  Properly characterize pre-cleaning wastes & dispose of them as hazardous waste when necessary. For hazardous waste questions, contact Sacramento County’s Hazardous Materials Division at (916) 875-8550. In West Sacramento, call Yolo County Hazardous Waste at (530) 666-8646. Or, call BERC at (916) 874-2100.

    Use sound techniques.................................................................................................................................................

  •  Block and/or protect storm drains that could potentially be impacted by your activities.

  •  Locate the property’s high and low spots and determine the appropriate area for wastewater pooling/collection.

  •  Minimize water usage while cleaning. Utilize water regulating nozzles and/or high pressure delivery systems.

  •  Use bio-friendly cleaners that are less toxic, or that do not contain hazardous substances, like hydrofluoric acid, muriatic acid, sodium hydroxide, bleach, etc.

  •  Avoid mixing non-hazardous wastewater with wastewater that contains (or may contain) hazardous materials, hazardous wastes or hazardous pollutants. Doing so may limit your disposal options—and add to your disposal costs—by increasing the total volume of wastewater that may require classification as hazardous waste.

    Collect wastewater .......................................................................................................................................................

  •  Contain and collect wastewater using appropriate containment measures or equipment. See pages 10-11 for information on equipment & techniques commonly used for wastewater collection. If necessary, create a temporary wastewater collection area.

  •  Place an oil absorbent pad on top of collected wastewater to reduce/remove floating oil to reduce the likelihood of that oil being re-deposited on the surface being cleaned. (Dispose of used oily pads as hazardous waste.)

    Properly dispose of wastewater/wastes.....................................................................................................................

    Evaluate collected wastewater/wastes for appropriate means of disposal to either: 1. a landscaped area,

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2. the sanitary sewer,
3. a hazardous waste treatment/storage facility, or 4. a permitted liquid waste treatment company.

Refer to pages 12-13 for more complete information on proper disposal and the parameters for each of the above disposal methods.

Once the wastewater has been collected, it may be necessary to rinse and collect the rinsate wastewater from the area, to avoid leaving behind residue that will be washed into the storm drain at a later time.

Sweep up any visible solids/residue left after collection/disposal/rinsing to prevent these materials from being discharged to the storm drain system later.

 

Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Proper Containment & Collection Of Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning Wastewater

Basic Information On Containment & Collection

There are many means for effectively containing and collecting wastewater from pressure washing and surface cleaning activities. Containment and collection systems can be portable designs or may be permanent. Systems may be technologically intricate and complex or quite simple. The best system to employ in any situation is the one that is most effective and allows you to remain compliant with laws and regulations.

Examples & Descriptions Of Containment Systems

The following examples are provided simply as a reference tool and no endorsement or recommendation is implied. This is not intended to be a complete listing of all devices available.

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Device

Description

Portable vacuum device with an attached hose boom that creates a portable containment barrier and also serves as the point of collection by suctioning up the wastewater.

Portable devices that create a protective barrier and prevent wastewater drainage to the storm drain. Wastewater will pool around the berm for collection and disposal. Must be constantly monitored for effectiveness.

Permanent curbs or berms that create a dedicated area used specifically for wastewater containment and collection. One common workable variation are drive-over “speed bump” type berms that provide a vehicle washing and wastewater containment area. The area should be covered to prevent rainwater entry or must have a controlled means for allowing true rainwater drainage, such as a manual drain valve. Uncovered bermed areas must be cleaned when rain is forecasted.

Roll-out or inflatable portable pool devices that create a temporary and movable work area that collects wastewater. Portable ramps are generally used to move vehicles in and out of containment area.

Covers or mats that cover and seal the storm drain allowing water collection.

Inflatable plugs that are inserted into the actual pipe exiting a storm drain inlet. The wastewater collects in the storm drain inlet and can be pumped or vacuumed out for proper disposal. These plugs can only be used on private property and all wastewater must be contained on-site.

Photo Example

Continued on next page

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vacuum booms

Temporary berms

Permanent berms

Containment pools & washpads

Storm drain covers & mats

Inflatable pipe plugs

 

Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Proper Containment & Collection Of Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning Wastewater, continued

Examples & Descriptions Of Collection Systems

The following examples are provided simply as a reference tool and no endorsement or recommendation is implied. This is not intended to be a complete listing of all devices available.

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Device

Wet/dry vacuums

Pump & hose

Description

Portable vacuum collection unit that suctions up wastewater for manual discharge. Some offer an exhaust feature that will reverse pump the water out for easier disposal.

A small submersible sump pump or manual pump can used to transport water from a containment area to a discharge point as long as the use is attended and temporary (put away daily).

Photo Example

Know This Before You Build A Structure or Buy A Wastewater Treatment Unit

Before investing in any collection or containment system that involves permanent structural improvements or wastewater treatment, it is important that you understand the regulatory issues and/or proper permits that may be required for such a system.

Structural Improvements

h In the case of structural improvements, particularly those with plumbing or electrical improvements, it will likely be necessary to get local building department permits and approvals.

Wastewater Treatment Systems

h

h

h

Wastewater treatment systems or water recycling systems may trigger additional regulatory requirements or authorizations beyond the purview of stormwater regulation. In particular, wastewater treatment units that separate contaminants (oil, toxic chemicals, etc) from water may be considered to be hazardous waste treatment systems if the wastewater being treated is classified as hazardous waste due to its pH or contaminant concentration.

In addition, it is possible for a treatment system to actually create a hazardous waste from non- hazardous wastewater because it removes water and concentrates the contaminants wastes to a point that the separated waste may be classified as hazardous waste. Hazardous wastes, like oily sludges, must be properly managed and disposed of in accordance with hazardous waste laws and regulations.

Any treatment unit that claims to create non-hazardous waste, bind up and neutralize toxic contaminants or change the hazardous characteristics of a waste may require specific authorization for use in the state of California. Please consult with Sacramento County’s Hazardous Materials Division (916-875-8550) or Yolo County’s Hazardous Waste Generators Program (530-666-8646) for West Sacramento. You may also call the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (800-72-TOXIC) or BERC (916-874-2100) for more information.

 

Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Proper Disposal Of Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning Wastewater

An Overview Of Proper Disposal Of Pressure Washing Wastewater

There are four basic compliant means of pressure washing wastewater disposal as summarized below:

Disposal method

Discharge to landscaped area

Discharge to the sanitary sewer in SRCSD service area...

Via private sanitary sewer cleanout, toilet, or utility sink, or

Via an authorized septage dump station

Wastewater Characteristics Wastewater cannot:

• be hazardous waste or • contain food, garbage, or

hazardous waste The wastewater:

• is from transportation related cleaning (washing of fleet vehicle exteriors, mobile auto detailing, rinsing of automobiles, recreational vehicles, boats, etc at retail sales dealerships)

• is from surface related cleaning (cleaning of sidewalks, plazas, driveways, parking garages, service stations, and building exteriors/walls)

• is from food service related cleaning (cleaning of restaurant alleys, grocery dumpster areas, food facility floor mats, exhaust or grease filters, lunch wagons {not engines}, and food carts)

• cannot be hazardous or flammable and cannot contain heavy metals, solids or significant amounts of oil/grease

• pH must be between 5.0 – 12.4 • may not cause damage to pipes,

workers or the treatment plant

• must otherwise meet all conditions of the SRCSD Combined Ordinance and Surface Cleaning Wastewater Policy

Wastewater is classified as a State or Federal hazardous waste because it is:

• ignitable (easily combustible or flammable)

• reactive (undergoes violent or rapid chemical reactions)

• corrosive (burns skin and eyes on contact; dissolves metals; pH ≤ 2 or pH ≥ 12.5)

• toxic (kills fish; contains harmful levels of heavy metals or hazardous substances)

Generally, wastewater is paint wash water, concrete wash water and stormwater contaminated with non- hazardous waste

Requirements
Requires property owner’s approval

Discharge cannot create nuisance conditions such as dead vegetation, odors, mud puddles, muddy track-out, insect breeding/attraction, etc

Must have adequate landscape surface to absorb all water without creating any overflow

FOR MOBILE PRESSURE WASHING CONTRACTORS:

Pressure washer must obtain a Mobile Pressure Washer/Surface Cleaner Permit from SRCSD (call 916-875-6470; currently no cost for this permit)

Discharge of transportation related, food service related and surface cleaning related pressure washing wastewater may occur without pre-approval for each discharge once the Mobile Pressure Washer/Surface Cleaner Permit is obtained and Sewer Use Questionnaire filing is complete

Discharge of eligible pressure washing wastewater to the sanitary sewer via a private sanitary sewer cleanout, toilet or utility sink may be performed at the job site with the property owner’s permission OR at the pressure washer’s place of business

Discharge to sanitary sewer must occur as described in the Surface Cleaning Wastewater Policy and according to the disposal precautions described on page 13 of this booklet

Discharge of eligible pressure washing wastewater may require pre-treatment prior to sewer acceptance depending on the nature of the wastewater such as when solids are present or there is excessive foaming. Call 916-875-6470 for guidance

Discharge to a septage dump station requires additional permitting by SRCSD

Discharge of pressure washing wastewater from other than food/transportation/surface cleaning activities, including engine/equipment degreasing or acid based cleaning, requires specific authorization and pre- approval prior to each and every discharge. Approvals may be granted on a case-by-case basis and pre-treatment standards may apply (such as treatment through an oil-water separator for oily wastes prior to discharge)

Transportation of wastewater on public roads for off-site disposal may require further permitting by other agencies (CHP, DMV, etc.)

Any treatment of wastewater that is hazardous waste before treatment requires permitting and authorization. In Sacramento County, call the Hazardous Materials Division (916-875-8550). In West Sacramento, call Yolo County’s Hazardous Waste Program (530-666-8646)

FOR ALL OTHERS IN PRE-EXISTING STATIONARY FACILITIES:

Disposal as hazardous waste

Disposal through a permitted liquid waste hauling company

 

 

 

A 310 gallons per day daily discharge limitation & other requirements apply— see the BERC publication entitled Guidelines for Manually Diverting Outdoor Wastewater to the Sanitary Sewer (916-874-2100 or www.sacberc.org)

Must transport through a licensed hazardous waste hauler Generator must have a State or Federally issued EPA ID Number

Permit required. In Sacramento County, call the Hazardous Materials Division (916-875-8550). In West Sacramento, call Yolo County’s Hazardous Waste Program (530-666-8646)

Permitted third party company hauls wastewater to treatment site before discharging to sewer under specific permit

Waste management company must be permitted by SRCSD to manage the wastewater

Continued on next page

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Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Proper Disposal Of Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning Wastewater, continued

Sanitary Sewer Disposal Outside The SRCSD Service Area

The SRCSD service area includes the unincorporated area of Sacramento County; the cities of Sacramento, Citrus Heights, Rancho Cordova, Folsom, Elk Grove and West Sacramento; and the towns of Walnut Grove, Courtland and Locke.

For discharges to the sanitary sewer outside the SRCSD service area, you must contact the appropriate sewer provider for all approvals and authorizations. In Galt, call 209-366-7260. In Isleton, call 916-777- 7770.

How To Access The Sanitary Sewer For Wastewater Disposal

When disposing of pressure washing wastewater to the sanitary sewer, access must be made through one of these means (listed here in preferred order):

  • An existing sewer drain inlet, such as a floor drain or mop sink, that has appropriate venting and trapping

  • A utility sink or other sink, excluding food preparation sinks

  • A toilet (no pumping aid allowed for this means of disposal)

  • A private sanitary sewer cleanout

    Discharge to utility sink Discharge to toilet Discharge to cleanout

    Follow these precautions when accessing the sanitary sewer to dispose of pressure washing wastewater:

    Precautions For Accessing The Sanitary Sewer For Wastewater Disposal

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Page 13 of 14

Sanitary Sewer Access Point

All
Utility sink or

other sink Toilet

Private Sanitary Sewer Cleanout

Precautions/Limitations

 

 

 

 

 

Actively supervise the discharge at all times
Make every effort to avoid spills during the discharge
Be prepared to immediately and properly contain, collect and dispose of any spills that might occur

Cannot use a food preparation sink for discharge

Gravity discharge only—no pumping aid can be used for wastewater transfer

The sanitary sewer cleanout must be privately owned

Handle the access with care to avoid contact with sewage which may pose health risks

Passive gravity discharge to the cleanout is preferred. If a pump is used, there must be an air gap or air space provided and the flow rate cannot exceed 5 gallons per minute

Immediately replace the cleanout cap when not in use

 

 

Preventing Stormwater Pollution: Your Guide To Best Management Practices For Pressure Washing & Surface Cleaning In The Greater Sacramento Area

Some Facts About Stormwater Pollution & Water Quality

Did You Know That?

  • The sanitary sewer system and the storm drain system are NOT the same thing!

  • Urban stormwater is one of the most significant sources of pollution affecting our nation’s rivers,

    lakes, and estuaries!

  • 40% of America’s rivers are too polluted for fishing, swimming or supporting aquatic life!

  • Washing or sweeping anything into the street gutter is not legal and is harmful to the environment!

  • At any time, about 25% of America’s beaches are closed due to water pollution concerns!

  • Dumping one quart of motor oil down a storm drain contaminates 250,000 gallons of water!

  • It’s estimated that each year over 180 million gallons of motor oil are disposed of illegally by people who change the oil in their trucks and cars!

  • The best protection for the storm drain system and our waterways begins with you!

    Our Water Quality Depends On It

    The quality and content of stormwater run-off affects the purity of local creeks and rivers because stormwater run-off drains directly into waterways without ever being treated in any way.

    Stormwater pollution harms our community’s drinking water, recreational waterways and natural ecosystems.

    Thanks for doing your part to prevent stormwater pollution and protect our community’s water quality!

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